Jeonju Office

(54999) 2F, Jeonju Cine Complex, 22, Jeonjugaeksa 3-gil, Wansan-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do, Republic of Korea

T. (063)288-5433 F. (063)288-5411

Seoul Office

(06740) 2F, Kyeongwon Bldg., 56 Bawoomoe-ro 43, Seocho-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea

T. (02)2285-0562 F. (02)2285-0560

Jeonju Cine Complex

(54999)22, Jeonjugaeksa 3-gil, Wansan-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do, Republic of Korea

T. (063)231-3377

COPYRIGHT © Jeonju International Film Festival ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

로고

Jeonju Digital Project

In 2000, Jeonju International Film Festival launched the Jeonju Digital Project with the conviction to create “teasers for the future films that inspire us” With emphasis on the word “digital” and focusing on the format of a short film, every year Jeonju Digital Project has compiled three short films to create a feature length omnibus film.

Since its inception, Jeonju International Film Festival has concentrated on the potential of digital films and has been working with filmmakers from all around the world to broaden the horizon of film aesthetics using digital technology. As a result, Jeonju Digital Project films have made remarkable achievements in international film festivals including Venice, Locarno, and Toronto. In 2006, Locarno International Film Festival hosted a special exhibition titled Digital Asia and showcased all of Jeonju Digital Project films that had been made to date. Memories (a short film triptych by Pedro Costa, Harun Farocki, and Eugene Green) from Jeonju Digital Project 2007 was nominated for the Golden Leopard at Locarno International Film Festival. Among the short films created as part of Jeonju Digital Project 2008, Mahamat Saleh Haroun’s Expectations won the Special Jury Prize in the Muhr Asia/Africa Short category at Dubai International Film Festival. In this way, the products of the Jeonju Digital Project once again confirmed the project’s impact on the film world. And in 2011, the project came to solidify its position as a project that attracts attention from filmmakers around the world with the participation of three colossuses of European cinema— Jean Marie Starub, Claire Denis, and Jose Luis Guerin.

In 2014, Jeonju Digital Project made the decision to support the production of feature-length films rather than short films. Since the digital film format has become ubiquitous, the project was also renamed to Jeonju Cinema Project. In line with its long-term vision, Jeonju Cinema Project aimed to continue its pursuit of innovation and focus on the characteristics and identity of Jeonju. This change to Jeonju Cinema Project marked a turning point for Jeonju International Film Festival to propose a new vision for film projects within the function and aesthetics of the film festival and the dynamics of the film industry.

 
Project
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001
2000

About Jeonju Digital Project 2013

Beyond Asia and into Europe, past Africa to the Americas, Jeonju Digital Project has left its traces with world-renowned filmmakers across various continents. In 2013, Jeonju Digital Project decided to focus on Asia.

Jeonju Digital Project 2013: Strangers invited representative Asian filmmakers to Jeonju once again, after all-Asian projects in 2009 and 2012. Japan’s renowned independent filmmaker Kobayashi Masahiro, China’s cineaste Zhang Lu, who delved into ontological questions in his previous works, and Indonesia’s Edwin, the future of Asian cinema, have come together under the theme Strangers.

Kobayashi Masahiro has been active in the Japanese film scene since his feature debut Closing Time in 1996. In 2012, he served as a jury member for the International Competition at the Jeonju International Film Festival. His film Strangers When We Meet is a sequel to his 2007 work The Rebirth. Through a husband and wife who do not communicate verbally at all, the director paints a picture of two strangers bound together in the most intimate relationship. Interestingly, he used the silent film format in order to depict the strangers inherent in the characters.

Zhang Lu introduced his feature debut Tang Shi at the Jeonju International Film Festival and also served as a jury member for the Korean Feature Film Competition in 2009. His film Grain In Ear was screened at La Semaine de la Critique at the Cannes Film Festival as well. Having established himself as an auteur who has worked in Korea and China, ZHANG Lu presents strangers who live in Seoul through his first documentary Scenery. Observing the city and the people inside, he asks through the film, “Who isn’t a stranger here?”

Edwin, who came to Jeonju International Film Festival with short films in 2008 and 2011, became a promising filmmaker in Asian cinema when his second feature Postcards From The Zoo competed for the Golden Bear at Berlin International Film Festival 2012. In Someone’s Wife In The Boat Of Someone´s Husband, Edwin spins a tale of mystery against the backdrop of beautiful Indonesian landscape. The film tells the story of Marina, a stranger who visits the faraway island of Sawai in search of a legend and meets a stranger who coincidentally has the same name as the hero of the legend.
Using both fiction and documentary styles, Jeonju Digital Project 2013: Strangers stares into the faces of “strangers” and brings the sentiments and emotions of our time to the screen.

 
Jeonju Office

(54999) 2F, Jeonju Cine Complex, 22, Jeonjugaeksa 3-gil, Wansan-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do, Republic of Korea

T. (063)288-5433 F. (063)288-5411

Seoul Office

(06740) 2F, Kyeongwon Bldg., 56 Bawoomoe-ro 43, Seocho-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea

T. (02)2285-0562 F. (02)2285-0560

Jeonju Cine Complex

(54999)22, Jeonjugaeksa 3-gil, Wansan-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do, Republic of Korea

T. (063)231-3377