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이전 이후
ImporterJeonju IFF
DistributorJeonju IFF
Release date 2012.02.23
12th
World Cinema
The Turin Horse
Director_ Bela Tarr
Hungary, France, Switzerland, Germany 2011 min 35mm b&w feature
Review

The Turin Horse starts with an anecdote of Nietzsche. In January 1889, Nietzsche witnessed the whipping of a horse, ran to the horse, threw his arms up around its neck and sobbed. As it is known, Nietzsche was sent to a mental hospital after a few days and remained in a vegetative state for the next 10 years before he died. Bela Tarr turns his and our eyes to the horse instead of Nietzsche. A long take in the next 4 minutes 20 seconds represents Tarr’s way of ‘Ecce Homo’. The camera persistently captures the horseman, the horse and the carriage returning home through violent winds and this scene reminds us of The Phantom Carriage by Victor Sjostrom and Au Hasard Balthazar by Robert Bresson, creating a marvelous moment. For the next 140 minutes, only consisting of 30 shots, the film plunges us into the story of the horseman, his daughter and the horse in wild and bleak moorland for 6 days. The Turin Horse focuses on the daily repetition of the same routine: making a fire, drawing water, changing clothes, taking care of the horse, eating potatoes and going to bed; it is somewhat both Nietzschean and non-Nietzschean. Even faced with signs of the end, or the hardships in life, the horseman and the daughter remain strong with a grim determination and ceaseless energy. However, the horseman and the daughter are far from the noble spirit dreamt by Nietzsche who barely spoke to the lower class in his entire life. The Turin Horse embodies eternal return, tests of life and affirmation (something that film critic Jonathan Rosenbaum called passion), completing the image of nothingness (that Tarr may have desired), materialist film and the world beyond reproduction. In a film without narratives, we get to live the same life that a woman with windblown hair lives, that a man who peels off the hot potato with one hand lives, and the horse that won’t budge an inch lives. Four years prior to the year set in this film, Van Gogh already expressed how meaningful those people’s lives were in one painting. The Turin Horse is a cinematic answer to The Potato Eaters. Tarr declared that The Turin Horse would be his last piece and no films in the 21st century may be able to replace his absence.(LEE Yong-cheol)

CREDIT
  • DirectorBela Tarr
  • ScreenplayBela Tarr, Laszlo Krasznahorkai
  • ProducerGabor Teni, Marie-Pierre Macia, Juliette Lepoutre, Ruth Waldburger, Martin Hagemann
  • CinematographyFred Kelemen
  • MusicMihaly Vig
CastErika Bok, Janos Derzsi, Hilary Kormos, Ricsi
DIRECTOR
Béla Tarr
Bela Tarr was born in 1955 in Pecs, Hungary. At age 16, he began his career as an amateur film-maker. He also worked as a shipyard handyman and porter. In 1977, he debuted with his feature film Family Nest. He graduated Film Academy in 1981. He is an associate professor at the Berlin DFFB.
Jeonju Office

(54999) 2F, Jeonju Cine Complex, 22, Jeonjugaeksa 3-gil, Wansan-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do, Republic of Korea

T. (063)288-5433 F. (063)288-5411

Seoul Office

(06740) 2F, Kyeongwon Bldg., 56 Bawoomoe-ro 43, Seocho-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea

T. (02)2285-0562 F. (02)2285-0560

Jeonju Cine Complex

(54999)22, Jeonjugaeksa 3-gil, Wansan-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do, Republic of Korea

T. (063)231-3377